We’ve added Ancient Coins

If you like Ancients, check out the inventory! We’ve added a few, with pictures and descriptions!

Peter Cabral on Collecting

$20 Liberty Head Gold Coin

 

Discover your Own Treasure in American History  

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The $20 Liberty Head gold coin is an American classic.

During the California Gold Rush, as our country expanded and grew, the coins were issued for circulation from 1850 through 1907. Although millions were made, many were lost in the 1930’s when a presidential order required citizens to deliver their gold to the Federal Reserve for melting. Fortunately, some were saved in collections or transferred for commercial payments overseas.

Today, you can see the first example of this magnificent coin, dated 1849, at the Smithsonian Institution. Even better, you can own a piece of history. A limited number of Choice Uncirculated coins are available for immediate delivery to you. Each is graded, certified, and guaranteed for authenticity by either the Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS) or the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation of America (NGC) as Mint State 64.

Currently priced at $1925 each, or $1900 when purchasing 20 or more, but hurry! We expect a quick sellout at this price.

Financial experts recommend gold as a valuable component of a diversified portfolio. In recent years, average circulated, common date $20 Liberty gold coins have also been used as an alternative bullion coin and hedge against inflation.

There’s nothing quite like the security of having your own private stash of gold, especially if it’s made up of century old $20 gold pieces!

Order today! Call (866)472-8126 

$1 1-oz Silver American Eagle

The American Eagle Bullion program was launched in 1986 with the sale of gold and silver bullion coins. A bullion coin is a coin that is valued by its weight in a specific precious metal. Each “Silver Eagle” contains a minimum of one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver. The Silver Bullion Coin is only available in the one ounce size.

American Eagle Silver Bullion Coins are affordable investments, beautiful collectibles and thoughtful gifts. They are the only silver bullion coins whose weight and purity are guaranteed by the United States Government, and the only silver coins allowed in an IRA. Available in tubes of 20 or boxes of 500 coins.
Obverse: “Walking Liberty” design based on Adolph A. Weinman’s 1916 “Walking Liberty” half dollar.
Reverse: Heraldic Eagle with Shield, symbolizing strength and endurance, engraved by John Mercanti.

Available today as low as 99 cents over cost! To order your silver American Eagle coin, or any of our other great pieces, please visit our inventory.

Numismatics on TV Show Castle

For all of my Coin Weenie friends, if you haven’t seen it yet, I strongly suggest that you watch Monday’s episode of Castle. There is a numismatic connection. I don’t want to be the spoiler – the episode is called “Get a Clue”.

http://abc.go.com/shows/castle

Gem Mint Quality MS65 $20 St. Gaudens gold

In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt asked the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens to help beautify our nation’s coinage by designing new, more attractive gold coinage. The ‘Double Eagle’ had its origin in 1850, as a response to the increased store of gold that resulted from the California gold rush. These coins did not circulate widely because of their very high face value. They were most often used for large international transactions. The intrinsic value of nearly one ounce of gold in each coin is certain to keep these a solid store of wealth.

Minted from 1907 until 1933, gold St. Gaudens twenty-dollar coins are considered by many to be the most beautiful of U.S. coins. The coin is named after its designer, Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Featuring a beautiful image of Liberty walking off the face of the coin, and an eagle in flight on the reverse, these coins are particularly attractive to collectors who wish to secure their portfolio with precious metals and the added benefit of rarity.

High-grade pieces are always a great way to add gold with the extra benefit of rarity to your portfolio. Gem Mint condition examples are available of the most beautiful coins ever minted. Please call for quantity discounts. All coins are PCGS or NGC certified and authenticated. Better dates also available.

Turmoil in the financial sector makes these a very sought after commodity. I am recommending to ALL clients to buy some of the most beautiful coins ever made, in gem quality. Please call us or email now to secure your own historic Gold St. Gaudens coins.

Prices fluctuate with market demand. PCGS or NGC certified available today. Visit our inventory for current prices.

Splendid 1794 Silver Dollar, PCGS VF25, B-1, BB-1, R.4

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1794 $1 VF25 PCGS. B-1, BB-1, R.4. The 1794 silver dollars are among the most heavily studied individual issues in the entire American numismatic series. The late Jack Collins spent decades studying and photographing individual specimens, with the goal of a provenance and history of the issue, including a complete pedigree record and photograph of every known specimen. At the time of his death, his record was nearly completed.
Early dollar specialist Martin Logies prepared his own study of the coins, largely based on the previous work that Collins had completed.
In The Flowing Hair Silver Dollars of 1794, Logies wrote an appreciation of Collins and his work:

“The author must also acknowledge the inspiration provided by the late numismatist and researcher Jack Collins, who himself spent a quarter of a century researching the 1794 dollar. While Jack’s untimely passing prevented the completion and publication of his research, he nonetheless served as the pioneer in this field, and demonstrated that a study such as this one was possible and meaningful.”

The knowledge available to numismatists today is such that few 1794 silver dollars remain anonymous. By that, we mean that nearly every 1794 silver dollar that appears in the marketplace today has appeared at some time in the past. We currently have a list of 132 different specimens, including this piece.
The glossy surfaces of this coin exhibit attractive olive, brown, and steel toning. The surfaces are smooth, with only a few minor marks. A small scrape of light silver appears on the obverse at 11 o’clock. The remaining nearly invisible marks on each side are ancient and blend nicely with the surrounding color. A thin scratch outside stars 4, 5, and 6 provides immediate identification of this specimen. Collins and Logies each published an extensive physical description of the coin, including the position of every single blemish. Most of the marks are consistent with the grade and hardly warrant discussion.
In 1981 the RARCOA cataloger wrote: “Choice Very Fine. An exceptional specimen with very light attractive toning over virtually immaculate surfaces that are totally devoid of nicks, scratches, or problems of any kind. Additionally, this piece has a full, complete four digit date.”
In 1987 the Bowers and Merena cataloger wrote: “A very pleasing coin with smooth even wear, and although a few marks are evident, as is normal for the grade, the piece is far above average in quality. The surfaces are a glossy light silver gray. Overall the piece has an extraordinary aesthetic appeal.”
In 1989 Bowers and Merena wrote: “A nice, glossy smooth specimen very faintly toned in appealing mottled hues of coppery gold and lilac gray. About two-thirds of Miss Liberty’s hair details are clear, as are an equal proportion of the eagle’s wing feathers. A pair of tiny rim marks are present, but these are scarcely worth mentioning.”
Ex: a collector surnamed O’Neil; American Coin (Alan Van Vliet, 1974); Pasadena Coin Co. (Henry and Richard Heller, 1974); Mitch Mellowitz; Jess Peters (8/1974), lot 904; Auction ’81 (RARCOA, 7/1981), lot 147; Bowers and Merena (11/1987), lot 368; John Koppell; Bowers and Merena (6/1989), lot 142.(Registry values: N10218) (NGC ID# 24WY, PCGS# 6851)

$220,000

Morgan Dollars Certified MS65

Morgan silver dollars were minted between 1878 and 1921 (with a notable break between 1905 and 1920). The coin is named after its designer, George T. Morgan. After Lincoln cents, Morgan dollars are the most commonly collected U.S. coins.

Some of the rarest U.S. coins are Morgan dollars, which can be attributed to the order to melt down 270 million silver dollars by the Pittman Act of 1918. It is estimated that only 17% of all Morgan dollars minted still exist.

However, some of the most common U.S. coins are Morgan dollars! There are still a large number available in many grades.

ProCoin is currently offering select PCGS or NGC Certified Morgan Silver Dollars at a Special Price! Visit our inventory for TODAY’S BEST VALUE!
(images for information only)


C3a Inverted Jenny Stamp Position 73

In 1918, the U.S. Post Office Department issued the first airmail stamp, picturing a Curtiss JN-4 airplane. It was a 24¢ bi-color stamp requiring two plates and two printing passes. Several sheets of stamps were printed incorrectly with the airplane upside down, or inverted. While all others were caught and destroyed, one of the errors was sold to William T. Robey at a post office in Washington, D.C., resulting in one of the most famous discoveries in U.S. stamp collecting history!

The legendary sheet of “Inverted Jennies” was then sold a week later to dealer Eugene Klein for $15,000, turning a hefty profit of $14,976 (quite a sum in those days)! The sheet then went to Colonel E.H.R. Green for $20,000, who broke it up and sold most of it over the years, keeping select examples for himself.

Professional Stamp Experts (PSE) has certified and encapsulated this Inverted Jenny stamp, a centered and exceptionally fresh example with lightly hinged original gum, as position 73 – PSE graded F-VF 75, Mint OGph.

For determining value, we can look to recent sales. On June 26, 2012, the last C3a Inverted Jenny was sold at auction. It was position 24, a lower grade than this one, certified by PSE as Fine 70. The auction house estimated a sales price of $450,000 before the auction, and it realized $280,000. Prior to that, in March, another example – position 74 – was also estimated to sell for $450,000 and sold for $625,000.00. Additionally, Stamp Market Quarterly currently values this piece at $440,000.00.

Please call Peter Cabral with any questions or comments.

1792 Plain Edge Copper Disme – Judd 11 Pollock 12

1792 Disme – Judd 11, Pollock 12, R-8.

PCGS Certified as Genuine.
58.2 gn.

Here is another great piece! Amazingly original 1792 copper plain edge disme pattern coin, colored with deep, milk-chocolate brown combining richness in red, green, gold and steel. The coin has full luster, the devices are strong and bold – Lady Liberty with her hair flowing, and the eagle spread in flight. Additionally – a subject of great debate for over 200 years – the obverse has strong chisel marks, and the corresponding flatness on the reverse, that appear to have been done at the mint. Different schools of thought say either to cancel the coin – instead of the still-needed die, or due to the coin getting stuck in a close collar.

Here is how it was described by Heritage in the 2008 February Long Beach Sale. 1792 P10C Disme, Judd-11, Pollock-12, R.8, Genuine PCGS. 58.2 gn. The obverse portrays Liberty facing to the left with flowing locks of hair. Around, LIBERTY PARENT OF SCIENCE AND INDUS(try), the date below the bust. On the reverse, an eagle flies in a plain field with the statutory legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around, and the denomination DISME below. Struck in copper with a plain edge. The plain edge is the distinction that separates Judd-11 from the relatively “common” Judd-10.

The obverse has several heavy marks that are immediately obvious. They are described as “cancellation marks” in the February 2005 Goldberg catalog where this specimen was last offered for sale. At that time, the cataloger observed: “Currently, the exact nature of these markings can only be speculated over and while we will attempt to do just that, feel free to come to your own conclusions. We feel the current coin is a presentation piece of the Plain Edge 1792 disme and that the coin possesses cancellation marks. Generally, the cancellation occurs on the die itself and therefore, the corresponding cancelled coins have raised marks where the metal would flow into the depressed canceling marks on the die. … we know that a single obverse die of this design can be accounted for. Since both Plain Edge (Judd-11) and Reeded Edge (Judd-10) examples are known for the 1792 copper disme, it seems entirely possible that Plain Edge examples were struck, then rejected in favor of the production of reeded edge examples. Obviously, with only one die in existence, the coin itself had to be cancelled rather than the die.”
The description in the Goldberg catalog continues at some length. Their speculation regarding cancellation marks, and canceling coins versus dies, is certainly fanciful, especially given the sale of old dies as scrap metal in later years. We are in full agreement that the marks appear contemporary with the coin, and believe that they occurred about the time the coin was struck.

Aside from the obverse marks, and the corresponding flatness on the reverse, the physical appearance of this disme is amazing. The surfaces on both sides have rich chocolate-brown color, with hints of darker steel. Both sides have full original cartwheel luster, and the design elements are all boldly rendered. It is truly a remarkable, intriguing, and stunning numismatic property that will continue to promote conversation and speculation. (#11029)

An American view of Money in Italy

Many of you already know Dan – he worked with me here but moved to Rome, Italy and opened a ProCoin branch last year.  I was talking with him about the goings on in Europe and below is what he had to say about his experiences in Italy.  I found it very interesting and wanted to share:

 

Having set up shop in the Eternal City about a year ago, I am still adjusting to some of the cultural differences. On my first visit to Italy, about 12 years ago, the country was using the lira currency. Exchanging American money at an Italian bank was confusing because what had been a few dollars in my wallet became thousands of liras. I found it difficult spending thousands of lira for mundane purchases.

Now (since 2002) the official currency of Italy is the Euro. I’m happy to be using the Euro since the conversion rate is much easier to calculate. Unfortunately, when the currency was changed, most prices jumped dramatically. Some small differences exist between the type of bills and coins, but I think most Americans find it easy to use the Euro currency. For example, there is no “quarter” coin, but there is a 20 cent coin instead. Also, there are convenient 1 and 2 Euro coins. There are 1 and 2 cent coins as well as the equivalent of our nickels, dimes and fifty cent pieces. Sensibly, the notes are made in different sizes and colors making it easier to distinguish between them.

When I moved here last year, the exchange rate was about 1 Euro for $1.50 – now the greenback has gained some ground against the Euro and the ratio is close to 1 Euro for $1.25 which represents an increase of almost 17%. Although I’ve adjusted nicely to using the Euro, it hasn’t been all that pleasant adjusting to how expensive most things are here. One of the few bargains left in Rome is coffee as most places charge less than a euro for a cup of Italian coffee. Cappuccino runs about 1 Euro normally. Remember to order caffe’ americano unless you want an espresso.

So, the bottom line about money in Italy is: don’t be intimidated by it BUT plan to spend a pile of dollars for the privilege of using it.


Federal Reserve Report

I read that according to a recently released Federal Reserve report, the median family’s net worth suffered a drop of 39% from 2007 to 2010. Holy smoke!

The report continued to note…

  *  Net worth in 2010 fell to levels not seen since 1992.

  *  Unrealized capital gains from real estate, businesses, stocks, or mutual funds plunged 11.6 percentage points.

  * While the level debt was unchanged, debt as a percentage of assets rose to 16.4% in 2010 from 14.8% in 2007 because the value of the underlying assets decreased faster.

Well, this got me thinking, and I did a bit of research…

      Gold prices more than doubled during the same time period.

Aristotle on GOLD

So I was thinking about money, because at some point the barter system must have become awkward if not impossible. For example, if you’re a fisherman and need bread… and the local baker has plenty of fish or doesn’t like fish… well, you’re out of luck. Or if you’re a farmer and a cold snap kills your crop, you have nothing to trade. You get the idea.

 The Greek philosopher Aristotle thought about money, too. He looked at the problem of “commensurability”, or how different things can be measured into the same units of value. And more than 2000 years ago, he came up with a list of qualities that would make “good” money.

  • Durable.  The ideal candidate would have to endure through time, the elements, and the wear and tear of constant transactions. (How about those fish?! Yikes!)
  • Portable. It would have to be easily movable, having value without a lot of bulk. (I guess that leaves out land or even cattle!)
  • Divisible and consistent.  A good form of money would have to be able to be split into small pieces, and put back together, without changing its fundamental value. (A work of art? Nope. Horse? Yuck!)
  • One last thing Aristotle considered… Intrinsic value. He believed that good money would have to be generally accepted as a form of exchange and store of value in and of itself, independent of anything else.

 So, what is it that meets these requirements? What is “good” money? For thousands of years, gold and silver have been used as dependable forms of money, accepted means of payment, and safe havens for wealth.

 Consider… old gold coins and gold bars have survived through history and remain part of mankind’s accumulated wealth to this day, AND all the gold that has ever been mined is still with us. Just thinking…

Buy Facebook? Would you rather have a piece of paper or solid gold?

My choice is the gold! While buying stocks can be like rolling the dice in Las Vegas, gold has been a trusted asset for thousands of years. Agreed, a diversified portfolio is highly recommended for building and preserving wealth, so stock and bonds can have their place. But many experts agree that there are compelling reasons to invest a portion in gold and other precious metals. And I have to say that no other investment offers the same feeling of holding a rare coin in my hand that was around the same time as Ben Franklin!

Food for thought: there is only one stock left that was in the original Dow Index.

2010 Boy Scouts America Silver Dollar PCGS Proof 70 Deep Cameo

The 2010 Boy Scouts Commemorative Proof Silver Dollar coins were produced to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Boy Scouts Program. History: As of 2010, the Boy Scouts of America Program is the largest youth organization in the U.S. It has close to 3 million young members and over 1 million adult members. Since February 8, 1910, the Boy Scouts of America has had more than 111 million participants in the program. Overview: On March 23, 2010, the U.S. Mint issued the 2010 Silver Dollar Boy Scout Commemorative coins. Many collectors were predicting a sellout before the coins were even issued by the U.S. Mint. Consequently, the Mint imposed a 100-coin maximum ordering limit per household. The Proof coins finally sold out on June 18, 2010. The Mint produced both Proof and Uncirculated versions of the 2010 Boy Scouts Commemorative coins. Between both product options, the maximum authorized mintage was set at 350,000. Both Uncirculated and Proof coins were produced at the Philadelphia Mint. This PERFECT example will continue to rise in value.

2009 $20 St. Gaudens Ultra High Relief PCGS MS70

2009 ULTRA HIGH RELIEF GOLD COIN

In January of 2009, the United States Mint issued the 2009 Ultra High Relief Double Eagle Gold Coin. This coin promises to fulfill Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ vision of an ultra high relief coin that could not be realized in 1907 with his legendary Double Eagle liberty design.

The 2009 Ultra High Relief Double Eagle Gold Coin shows the Nation and the world the very best the United States Mint has to offer. The 21st century vision of the United States Mint, combined with technological advances, enabled the United States Mint to realize the previously unattainable goal of making the coin accessible to all Americans.

Through 21st century technology and the vision of Director Ed Moy, original Saint-Gaudens coin plasters were digitally mapped by the United States Mint. Using the digital design and die-making process, the Saint-Gaudens sculpture — in ultra high relief — has been updated to reflect the year 2009, an additional four stars to represent the current 50 states, and the inscription “In God We Trust,” which was not on the 1907 version.

Additionally, a small border was added for a more consistent edge. The 2009 coin is made of 24-karat gold. Pure 24-karat gold is much more malleable than 22-karat or 90% gold coins, making it better material for striking the ultra high relief. The coin is a uniquely American artistic expression — created by an American sculptor and crafted by an iconic American institution.

Judd 11 1792 Disme

1792 Disme – Judd 11, Pollock 12, R-8.

PCGS Certified as Genuine.
58.2 gn.

Here is another great piece! Amazingly original 1792 copper plain edge disme pattern coin, colored with deep, milk-chocolate brown combining richness in red, green, gold and steel. The coin has full luster, the devices are strong and bold – Lady Liberty with her hair flowing, and the eagle spread in flight. Additionally – a subject of great debate for over 200 years – the obverse has strong chisel marks, and the corresponding flatness on the reverse, that appear to have been done at the mint. Different schools of thought say either to cancel the coin – instead of the still-needed die, or due to the coin getting stuck in a close collar.

Here is how it was described by Heritage in the 2008 February Long Beach Sale. 1792 P10C Disme, Judd-11, Pollock-12, R.8, Genuine PCGS. 58.2 gn. The obverse portrays Liberty facing to the left with flowing locks of hair. Around, LIBERTY PARENT OF SCIENCE AND INDUS(try), the date below the bust. On the reverse, an eagle flies in a plain field with the statutory legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around, and the denomination DISME below. Struck in copper with a plain edge. The plain edge is the distinction that separates Judd-11 from the relatively “common” Judd-10.

The obverse has several heavy marks that are immediately obvious. They are described as “cancellation marks” in the February 2005 Goldberg catalog where this specimen was last offered for sale. At that time, the cataloger observed: “Currently, the exact nature of these markings can only be speculated over and while we will attempt to do just that, feel free to come to your own conclusions. We feel the current coin is a presentation piece of the Plain Edge 1792 disme and that the coin possesses cancellation marks. Generally, the cancellation occurs on the die itself and therefore, the corresponding cancelled coins have raised marks where the metal would flow into the depressed canceling marks on the die. … we know that a single obverse die of this design can be accounted for. Since both Plain Edge (Judd-11) and Reeded Edge (Judd-10) examples are known for the 1792 copper disme, it seems entirely possible that Plain Edge examples were struck, then rejected in favor of the production of reeded edge examples. Obviously, with only one die in existence, the coin itself had to be cancelled rather than the die.”
The description in the Goldberg catalog continues at some length. Their speculation regarding cancellation marks, and canceling coins versus dies, is certainly fanciful, especially given the sale of old dies as scrap metal in later years. We are in full agreement that the marks appear contemporary with the coin, and believe that they occurred about the time the coin was struck.

Aside from the obverse marks, and the corresponding flatness on the reverse, the physical appearance of this disme is amazing. The surfaces on both sides have rich chocolate-brown color, with hints of darker steel. Both sides have full original cartwheel luster, and the design elements are all boldly rendered. It is truly a remarkable, intriguing, and stunning numismatic property that will continue to promote conversation and speculation. (#11029)

Scott #915 5c multicolor 1943 overrun countries France Gem 100

PSE certified 5 cent US stamp. This stamp is in Mint Condition with original gum, never hinged. PSE certified as Gem 100 for authenticity and condition. Please call for further information.

Scott #C18 50c stamp 1933 United States Green Zeppelin F-VF 75

‘A Century of Flight’

Flashback to 1933 as a gorgeous Zeppelin flies through the air over a fabulous city and hangar. This stamp is in Mint Condition with original gum, never hinged. PSE certified as F-VF 75 for authenticity and condition. Please call for further information.

Scott #866 3c Bright Red Violet, 1940 James Russell Lowell Gem 100

PSE graded Gem 100, Mint OGnh Scott#866

Scott #869 1c Bright Blue Green, 1940 Horace Mann Gem 100

PSE graded Gem 100 Mint, OGnh Scott #869

Scott #296a 4c Deep Red Brown & Black, Center Inverted 1901 Pan-American Exp

4c Deep Red Brown & Black, Center Inverted 1901 Pan-American Exposition Issue (296a), centered to the lower left but exceptionally fresh with full, somewhat disturbed original gum; tiny thin spot and even tinier scuff in center, otherwise about Fine.

Stamp Market Quarterly value is $35,000

Expertization: 2009 PSE Certificate graded FR-G 20

The 4¢ Pan-American invert was not regularly issued but was instead created intentionally in a special printing of two sheets of 200. Of the 400 inverts printed, one sheet of 200 was handstamped with a small “Specimen” overprint, while another half-sheet (pane) of 100 was stuck onto a Post Office ledger sheet and retained in the postal archives. Of the 300 not retained by the post office, both with and without the “Specimen” overprint, a little over 100 were distributed by postal authorities to friends and dignitaries and the rest were destroyed. Sometime in the mid-1910s the Post Office exchanged 97 of the 100 copies in the archives for stamps that were needed for the government collection.

These 97, since they had been stuck onto a ledger sheet, were nearly all thinned and/or had badly disturbed gum.

Scott #QE4a 25c Yellow Green, 1928 Special Handling Superb 98

An exceptional stamp with dead-on perfect centering amidst balanced margins, This stamp is a borderline Gem-100. According to PSE’s population report only one stamp has received a higher grade. Call us for more info today (866) 472-8126

Anchor Your Portfolio with Gold

Recent market turmoil has again shown that gold is a safe haven in rough financial waters. Gold has been mankind’s currency of choice for thousands of years. Gold protects your portfolio as a safe, secure, liquid tangible asset.

For physical delivery, this asset can be obtained in several forms including bars, coins, jewelry and art, among others. Bars usually need to be assayed before trading. Jewelry and art, although very beautiful, have high fabrication premiums.
For most individuals, Legal Tender gold coins are the easiest to buy, sell and trade, and are backed by their country of origin.
Some examples are American Eagles, Canadian Maple Leafs, South African Krugerrands and Chinese Pandas.

Basic Principles when Buying Gold

When buying gold for physical delivery, always take shipping charges into consideration. Be sure to have a storage facility in mind like a safe or safety deposit box. Only deal with reputable dealers – gold is CASH.

$50 1-oz. Gold American Eagle

The American Eagle Bullion program was launched in 1986 with the sale of gold and silver bullion coins. Congressionally authorized American Eagle Bullion coins provide investors with a convenient and cost effective way to add a small amount of physical precious metals to their investment portfolios.

American Eagles are the only bullion coins whose weight, content and purity are guaranteed by the United States Government. Investors can buy them with confidence, knowing the coins contain their stated amount of gold. It is important to note that American Eagles can be included in Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs).
Obverse: Modified design of “Standing Liberty” by Augustus Saint Gaudens’ for U.S. Double Eagle $20 gold piece, often considered one of America’s most beautiful coins.

Reverse: Nest of American Eagles, symbolizing family tradition and unity, designed by Mrs. Miley Frances Busiek.
Please call for today’s price!

Johnson and Mathey Gold Kilo Bars

Johnson and Mathey Hallmarked one Kilo Gold Bars, 32.15 ounces. Available today at spot plus $15 per ounce. Prices may change with availability, and are based on good funds in house. Please call for current pricing.

Scott #C3a 24c Airmail “Inverted Jenny” in Colonel Green’s Locket – UNIQUE

In 1918, the U.S. Post Office Department issued the first airmail stamp, picturing a Curtiss JN-4 airplane. It was a 24c bi-color stamp requiring two plates and two printing passes. Several of the sheets were printed incorrectly with the airplane upside down, or inverted. While all others were caught and destroyed, one of the errors was sold to William T. Robey at a post office in Washington, D.C., resulting in one of the most famous discoveries in U.S. stamp collecting history!

The legendary sheet of “Inverted Jennies” was then sold a week later to dealer Eugene Klein for $15,000, turning a hefty profit of $14,976 (quite a sum in those days)!

The sheet then went to Colonel E.H.R. Green for $20,000, who broke it up and sold most of it over the years, keeping select examples for himself.

This copy is known as 24c Carmine Rose & Blue, Center Inverted (C3a), encased in the original locket created by Col. Green for his wife, Mabel. Green had the Invert, which is from position 9 with a natural straight edge at the top, placed into the locket back to back with a normal 24c. The invert, which is fresh and bright, has two trivial corner creases at the bottom from being too close to the edge of the locket at some time in its past. The gum has never been hinged!

Scott never hinged value is $675,000!

Provenance: Col. Green to his wife Mabel, to a close family friend. Over the years, the Colonel had given Mabel many elaborate gifts, such as the $625,000 he gave her upon their marriage. However, the locket must have had some sentimental value because, although Green’s stamps were sold upon his death in 1936, Mabel saved the locket until her own demise in 1950.

 

Available today at $525,000.00

Scott #821 16c Black, 1938 Abraham Lincoln Gem 100

PSE graded Gem 100 Mint, OGnh Scott #821

 

1889 CC $1 NGC MS62 Morgan Silver Dollar

[slideshow]

Rare Coins 101

A few upcoming topics –

  • The secret to making money in …
  • When coin dealers “Feel Safe” here’s what they’ve done …
  • How to protect your money in one call …
  • How to out perform T-Bills, the Stock Market without being Warren Buffet

Double Eagles

 

(1907-1933) Saint-Gaudens 

Augustus St. Gaudens, the premier sculptor of his day, was asked by President Theodore Roosevelt to redesign our gold coinage. President Roosevelt felt that our coins were becoming stale and needed a fresh new design. St. Gaudens provided this with a twenty-dollar gold piece design that is now considered to be the most beautiful United States coin ever minted!

The obverse shows Lady Liberty literally walking off the face of the coin, while the reverse shows an eagle in flight, again literally flying off the coin. This beautiful design has been cherished by collectors since the first day they were minted!

There were approximately 12,000 high pieces struck for general circulation during the issuance of these first coins. Their relief is much higher than for later issues, causing problems in the minting process, and for the bankers handling the coins. Later pieces were minted with a much flatter relief.

 

1907.21907.31907.1

1907 $20 High Relief PCGS GENUINE Wired Edge     Price – $8,000.00

$20$20.1

1907 $20 High Relief PCGS MS63 Wired Edge     Price - $28,500

pro1pro3

1907 $20 High Relief PCGS MS63 Flat Edge CAC     Price - $32,500

pwc3pwc4

1907 $20 High Relief NGC MS64 Wired Edge     Price - $33,000

 

 

Half Cents

 

We are currently not publicly listing coins in this heading, our inventory changes daily, and we have many more coins than listed. Please call or email with your confidential wantlist, and we will get back in touch shortly. Thank you.

 

Proof Sets

 

We are currently not publicly listing coins in this heading, our inventory changes daily, and we have many more coins than listed.  Please call or email with your confidential wantlist, and we will get back in touch shortly. Thank you.